Brute Norse Podcast ep. 15: Pagan Christmas

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Woe is me, it’s the ghost of Brute Norse podcasts. In this episode Eirik shares what the holidays mean to him as a homesick barbarian/contrarian, and covers some of the many yuletide horrors past folks had to put up with. And concerning the paganism of Christmas: Norse religious festivals were determined according to a lunisolar calendar, so when exactly did the vikings celebrate jól, what exactly is its relationship to the winter solstice, and why does any of that matter to you and me?

Admittedly, a lot of the material in this podcast has been covered in this article, now available to your listening pleasure due to popular demand! Happy Yule!

Check out the Brute Norse Yuletide playlist here.


Support Brute Norse on Patreon or buy a shirt, maðrlover

Brute Norse Podcast Ep. 14: The Archaeology of Evil Dead

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Archaeologists have recently stumbled upon a never before heard 14th episode of the Brute Norse Podcast, so without further ado: It’s another episode of the Brute Norse Podcast!

In this episode, Eirik and Aksel catch up after several months of disconnect and get up to speed with some of their favorite archaeological news of 2018. They speculate on the contents of prehistoric alcoholic beverages, muse on recent incidents on North Sentinel Island, analyze Danish gang wars in light of warlike honor-shame societies and Norse sexual defamation, look at the so-called Staffordshire hoard helmet, and find some odd historical parallels to the Evil Dead franchise.

Other topics more-or-less covered:
- The Jellestad Viking Ship
- Hot tips for budding criminals who hate the past
- The oriental black market
- Norse dilemmas: Which is worse - Being flakey, or being a murderer?
- Dwarf children?!
- Prostitution in the legendary sagas
- Digital chess in the legendary sagas
- Body horror in the legendary sagas
- Exciting new research on the guldgubber

Like the skaldic poets of old, Brute Norse endures and prospers at the generous mercy of warlords and kleptocrats such as yourself, so why not have peek at the Brute Norse Patreon page? And while we’re at it, check out some of the rad new additions to the Teespring store.
And don’t forget to subscribe to Brute Norse on the podcast provider of your choice!




Brute Norse Podcast Ep. 13: Supernatural Islands and the Folks that Live There

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Vineyards and wheat fields forever! In this episode Eirik takes a long, hard look at the belief in supernatural isles in Northern Europe. Our fantastic odyssey begins with the Norse discovery of America and its peculiar ties to scholarly hearsay in the Middle Ages, before we go on to address the rampant abundance of vanishing isles along the Scandinavian coast.

Other subjects include:
- Minimally counterintuitive concepts
- The counter-factual Vinland wine industry
- Order from chaos 101
- Imperialist pigs and pyromaniac expansionism
- How to terrorize the huldufólk with every day objects
- Layered oceans
- Much, much, much more

Musical contribution: Sjóraust IV by Richard Moult.
Available through most, if not all, podcast services.


Já maðr, do you want to support the Brute Norse effort? Consider going that extra mile and pledge your support on Patreon/brutenorse, or buy a rad shirt in the Teespring store (all patrons get a 20% reduction!). Here’s the latest design:

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This episode would have been impossible without Jan E. Byberg's Dei lukkelege øyane i norsk folketradisjon (1970). Are you having trouble telling if you should drink, whore, and swindle, or rise early and avoid wenches at all cost? Check out The King’s Mirror and never wonder again.

Let the Bodies Hit the Bog! (Wetland Sacrifice pt. II): The Brute Norse Podcast ep. 12

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In this thrilling conclusion to our wetland venture, Aksel and Eirik take an up close and personal look at some of our favorite bog bodies. We sink knee deep in the mysterious Roman and Migration Era weapon sacrifices, and dive into bog butter, bog milk, and bog cheese, exploring the wonders of ancient refrigeration and self-tanning (turning your face into leather over the course of generations).

Listen to it on soundcloud, or subscribe using only the finest podcasting apps. If you enjoy Brute Norse, do consider pledging to the Patreon, buying a shirt, or even just sharing content with likeminded friends. Play it to your dog, mention us in your prayers and incantations, or invest in the future by partitioning the episode onto floppy disks and hiding them under the floorboards of your local church. ANYTHING helps.

Brute Norse Podcast ep. 11: Battle Axes & Cranium Cults (Wetland Sacrifice pt.I)

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In this episode, Eirik and Aksel begin their journey into the bogs of Northern Europe. Along the way we stop to look at:

  • Water symbolism in:

Norse mythology

Viking Era burial practices

Northern European Folklore

  • Water depositions from:

The Northern Mesolithic,

their Bronze Age development,

and mentally prepare for the grim reality of Iron Age human sacrifice.

If you want to subscribe to your favorite non-entry-level podcast of Ancient Scandinavian apocrypha, then rest assured that you will find the Brute Norse Podcast on any podcast app or service provider, as far as I know.

 

If you would like to   

Support Brute Norse                  you can        

 check out   

 either/or/and

my Patreon            these sweet hirts

                                 

                if not you can:

                        

       Relax and have a nice day!
(But do share it with your friends)

Brute Norse Podcast ep.10: Talking Living History and Brutality with Dieter Huggins

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In this episode I am joined by Wulfheodenas founding member, archaeologist/cage fighter Dieter Huggins. Beyond him spouting wisdom from his life on the forefront of living history, here are some of the things you'll find in this veritable smörgåsbord of an interview:
- The current state of Dark Age living history.
- Funerary pageantry among early Scandinavians and Anglo-Saxons.
- The regulation of violence past and present, from warbands to the UFC, and the ambivalence of warrior ethos.
- Fair doses of camp life nostalgia.

Subscribe using any podcast app that runs at all. If you dig it, here are some of many ways you can support Brute Norse. Share the episode with your friends, bring it up on a blind date, or if you want to walk the extra mile: Subscribe to Brute Norse on Patreon, or buy a shirt. Whatever you do, your support will not go unappreciated. Until next time, ves þú heill.

Brute Norse Podcast ep.9: The Chronologies of Ancient Scandinavia pt.3 - Pillaging the Past

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In the final segment of the Chronologies of Ancient Scandinavia, Eirik and Aksel tackle the slippery slope of commodification of viking heritage, its uses and abuses. Topics raised include, but are not limited to:
- Are meaderies the devil?
- Are viking re-enactors destroying traditional crafts?
- Is the Society for Creative Anachronism a totalitarian organization?
- Is Greco-Roman heritage a threat to democracy?
- Is human sacrifice as bad as they say?
- Can our admiration for the thieving, hyperviolent, cheating, and overall sinful ways of our ancestors be morally justified?

We even find some time to talk about the chronology! Subscribe using any podcasting service, share to your hearts content, and definitely do consider supporting Brute Norse on Patreon. Also check out the Brute Norse teespring store for some rad shirts.

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The Brute Norse Podcast Ep.8: The Chronologies of Ancient Scandinavia pt.II

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In this part, Aksel and Eirik get into the actual timeline of Scandinavian prehistory with an emphasis on the Bronze and Iron Ages, including the Viking Age. We talk about the materiality of these periods, the language, and regional variation, before we segway drunkenly into our own snobbery.

ᛊᚢᛈᛟᚱᛏ:ᛒᚱᚢᛏᛖ:ᚾᛟᚱᛊᛖ:ᛟᚾ:ᛈᚨᛏᚱᛖᛟᚾ

The Brute Norse Podcast Ep.7: The Chronology of Ancient Scandinavia pt.I

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Tick tock, friends and foes. In the next few episodes we're tackling time itself, or rather our tendency to divide the fourth dimension into eras!

Aksel joins the podcast once again to help unravel the dense issue of Scandinavian chronology. We start off softly with a primer on the origin and development of the ages themselves, from the Greek concept of the Golden Age, to the timeline of modern archaeology, before we get into how the Norsemen developed their own system of ages based on surprisingly scientific criteria.

Ginnungagap, The Boundless Enclosure + The Trollish Theory of Art. Brute Norse Podcast Ep.6

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The giants called: They want their primeval chaos back! This episode features a cosmic horror reimagining of the Norse myth of creation, adapted from my essay "The Trollish Theory of Art: a scandifuturist art creation myth", published in the recent darkness-edition of

Scandinavian Kunstforum

. Afterwards, I give a quick overview of Norse poetic morbidity, and I throw out a few thoughts on why a philosophy based on Nordic folklore and cosmology could bridge the gap between traditional and modern art forms.

As always, if you like my work, please consider supporting me on

Patreon

. But you can also help by subscribing to the podcast, follwing Brute Norse on

Facebook

and

Instagram

, and sharing to your hearts content!

A Supernatural Guide to the Oseberg Ship (The Brute Norse Podcast Ep.5)

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In this Halloween special, we tackle the weird and mysterious case of the Oseberg ship, and the lesser known, but true, story of how a Brooklyn clairvoyant may have caused the discovery of the most extravagant Viking Age burial ever found.

The episode is available from all podcast apps worthy of praise. If you like my stuff, feel free to rate, review or subscribe. Or better yet; pledge your support over at Patreon.com/brutenorse!

Barbarian Warlords of Free Germania (Pt.2) - The Brute Norse Podcast

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In this episode, archaeologist Aksel Klausen takes us deeper into the dank woods of Germania Libera, where we take a brief glance at Germanic, Hunnic, and Roman identity, and how the Post-Roman Germanic kingdoms began to look through the rubble of the empire to legitimize themselves, while other leaders looked to the gods.

On the way, we also find the time to consider Germanic animal ornament as an expression of surrealist art, asemic writing, and runes and writing in a non-written, storytelling culture.

As custom dictates, outtakes are available for Brute Norse supporters over at Patreon. Subscribe to the Brute Norse Podcast on the podcast app of your choice and be surprised by a soothing notification every now and then.

Speaking of barbarians; have you seen my Old Norse dub of Conan the Barbarian yet? DO IT NOW

Barbarian Warlords of Free Germania (Pt.1) - The Brute Norse Podcast Ep.3

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Archaeologist Aksel Klausen came knocking to discuss the ecstacy of gold in the Nordic Iron Age, weapon sacrifices, and the emergence of ancient Germanic warrior kleptocrats. A royal mind germ that would only grow as Rome's power grew weaker, giving birth to powerful empires - and eventually the nation state. This is the first half of my two-part interview with a man who will no doubt visit us again in the future. The episode is available through Youtube, iTunes, Soundcloud, and any podcast app worth mentioning. If you want a head start on all future episodes, or hear Aksel and I yack on about ancient booze (recipes included), then pledge your support over at the Brute Norse Patreon page today. The gods will be most pleased. 

For those who want to go beyond:

  • Curious to know more about Aksel's research and the princely burial at Avaldsnes? Check out his Master's Thesis here.
  • We also mentioned the research of our friend Håkon Reiersen, who just released his PhD on Roman and Migration Era Central places in  West Norway. Check it out.

The Brute Norse Podcast ep. 2: What the Romans Did for Us

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It's been an indecent while since the last episode of the Brute Norse podcast hit the web. Now that autumn is in the air and I awake from the slothful haze of summer it's time to pick up the speed, and thus I bring you this hour long retreat into the Germanic tribal hinterlands.

The Germanic tribes are often credited with the destruction of the Western Roman Empire. There are no Roman roads in Scandinavia, still the empire resonated in the cultural memory of the Vikings. From Teutoburger Wald to the Taliban, Brute Norse joins forces with Krister Vasshus, PhD student in onomastic sciences at the University of Bergen, to discuss just how far the Roman shadow fell beyond its Northern border.

The episode is now available on Soundcloud and all podcast apps worth their salt. Image courtesy the University of Bergen.

If you enjoyed this episode, or any of my other content, please consider supporting me on

Patreon

.

Brute Norse Podcast Ep.1: The Archaeology of Emotion with Leszek Gardeła

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It is my supreme pleasure to reveal the next chapter in the Brute Norse saga, namely the spanking new Brute Norse Podcast. Keeping up with the public can be a difficult task. I guess it's all about meeting your audience where they are at. While articles have their charm, they lack the versatility and perks of the podcast format. My readers have been suggesting I try it out for some time, and I admit that I've shied away from certain topics in the past, thinking they deserved something more sparkly than my usual article format. With the recent revamp of the blog I think the time is ripe to try something fresh and new.

A podcast allows me to let someone else do the talking for a change, and lets me invite people with talents and knowledge I may not possess. This episode was a treat to produce for that exact reason. I the had pleasure of meeting up with Leszek Gardeła, who is an assistant professor of archaeology at the University of Rzeszów, Poland. A rising star of viking scholarship, his vast body of work includes magical staffs, ritual specialists, the viking diaspora in Poland, and the spooky world of "atypical burials". We sat down for a discussion about the ambiguity of magic, morbid viking burials, and the ethics of studying the dead. He recently published his doctoral thesis about magic staffs in the viking era. I've featured his work previously in my article on the magical practice of seiðr.

Leszek frequently works with the Polish artist and illustrator Mirosław Kuźma to reconstruct the various graves he studies, adding imagination and color to the dark past. I highly recommend you check out his work.

As for the podcast itself: It is now available through Soundcloud, iTunes, and any podcast app worth it's salt, so be sure to subscribe!

Trekroner-Gryderhöj A 505, by Mirosław Kuźma

Trekroner-Gryderhöj A 505, by Mirosław Kuźma